Lesson 10.1 – Dominant 7th Chords

The dominant 7th chord is a major triad chord with the addition of a minor 7th note. To
make the 7th note minor, flatten it by dropping the tone a 1/2 step. The term “7th chord,”
with no further qualification (e.g. G7), is referring to a major chord with a minor 7th, as
opposed to various other constructions of 7th chords (covered in Lesson 26).

G7 Major Chord

The first dominant 7th chord we are going to play is the G7 chord.

For this chord we are again using a barre across all the strings. Remember, a dominant 7th chord has a minor 7th added to the major triad (1-3-5 notes). So if we take the G major scale (G-A-B-C-D-E-F#-G) – we can take the 7th note and drop it a half-step (or semi-tone). In this case we are taking the F# and dropping it down to F.

Added to the major triad gives us the G7 chord, and it looks like this:

Coming soon.

+ Lesson Info

Lesson 10.1 – Dominant 7th Chords

The dominant 7th chord is a major triad chord with the addition of a minor 7th note. To
make the 7th note minor, flatten it by dropping the tone a 1/2 step. The term “7th chord,”
with no further qualification (e.g. G7), is referring to a major chord with a minor 7th, as
opposed to various other constructions of 7th chords (covered in Lesson 26).

G7 Major Chord

The first dominant 7th chord we are going to play is the G7 chord.

For this chord we are again using a barre across all the strings. Remember, a dominant 7th chord has a minor 7th added to the major triad (1-3-5 notes). So if we take the G major scale (G-A-B-C-D-E-F#-G) – we can take the 7th note and drop it a half-step (or semi-tone). In this case we are taking the F# and dropping it down to F.

Added to the major triad gives us the G7 chord, and it looks like this:

+ Transcription

Coming soon.