Lesson 11.4 – The 12 Bar Blues

The most common form of the blues is the 12-bar blues. The term “12-bar” refers to the number of bars, or measures, used in the progression. Most blues music is played in a 4/ 4 time signature, which means there are four beats in each bar and each quarter note gets one beat.

In a blues song the 12-bar progression gets repeated over the entire length of the song. The standard blues form can be played in any key and typically features three chords. These chords are based on the first (I), fourth (IV) and fifth (V) notes of an eight-note scale. The relevant chords are traditionally called the one-four-five chords, also known as the one-four­-five chord progression.

The 12-bar blues form follows this chord pattern:

The 1st four bars are:

The 2nd four bars are:

The last four bars are:

If you look at the A Major Scale, you can see which notes will become our I, IV, V notes.

The notes for the 12 Bar Blues in the key of A are:

Coming soon.

+ Lesson Info

Lesson 11.4 – The 12 Bar Blues

The most common form of the blues is the 12-bar blues. The term “12-bar” refers to the number of bars, or measures, used in the progression. Most blues music is played in a 4/ 4 time signature, which means there are four beats in each bar and each quarter note gets one beat.

In a blues song the 12-bar progression gets repeated over the entire length of the song. The standard blues form can be played in any key and typically features three chords. These chords are based on the first (I), fourth (IV) and fifth (V) notes of an eight-note scale. The relevant chords are traditionally called the one-four-five chords, also known as the one-four­-five chord progression.

The 12-bar blues form follows this chord pattern:

The 1st four bars are:

The 2nd four bars are:

The last four bars are:

If you look at the A Major Scale, you can see which notes will become our I, IV, V notes.

The notes for the 12 Bar Blues in the key of A are:

+ Transcription

Coming soon.