Lesson 14.4 – Hammer Ons

To hammer-on, pluck any string (open or fretted), then press or “hammer-on” the same string at a higher fret.

Here are a few tips to develop proper hammer-on technique:

  • You should use some amount of force when hammering the string, but you do not need to slam down with all your strength.
  • Make sure you always press your finger straight down on the string when performing a hammer-on, if you aren’t accurate, the hammer-on may sound weak or like a “dud” note.
  • Repeat the technique on all of the strings on different frets. Also combine hammer-ons and pull-offs while practicing.

Hammer Ons Notation

Hammer-on notation in music is almost identical to pull-off notation.

Published tablature usually has a curved line, or arc, over or under the notes involved, just as in the pull-off, however, instead of a “P” on the arc, hammer-ons will have an “H.”

Pull-offs between two notes in internet tablature are represented by either a “p”, “^”, or both. The “^” is used for both hammer-ons and pull-offs, but you can tell the difference between a pull-off and a hammer-on by looking at the second note. If the 2nd note is lower than the 1st note, then it is a pull-off.

Similar to published tablature, standard notation uses an arc, but does not include the “P”.

Coming soon.

+ Lesson Info

Lesson 14.4 – Hammer Ons

To hammer-on, pluck any string (open or fretted), then press or “hammer-on” the same string at a higher fret.

Here are a few tips to develop proper hammer-on technique:

  • You should use some amount of force when hammering the string, but you do not need to slam down with all your strength.
  • Make sure you always press your finger straight down on the string when performing a hammer-on, if you aren’t accurate, the hammer-on may sound weak or like a “dud” note.
  • Repeat the technique on all of the strings on different frets. Also combine hammer-ons and pull-offs while practicing.

Hammer Ons Notation

Hammer-on notation in music is almost identical to pull-off notation.

Published tablature usually has a curved line, or arc, over or under the notes involved, just as in the pull-off, however, instead of a “P” on the arc, hammer-ons will have an “H.”

Pull-offs between two notes in internet tablature are represented by either a “p”, “^”, or both. The “^” is used for both hammer-ons and pull-offs, but you can tell the difference between a pull-off and a hammer-on by looking at the second note. If the 2nd note is lower than the 1st note, then it is a pull-off.

Similar to published tablature, standard notation uses an arc, but does not include the “P”.

+ Transcription

Coming soon.